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Geodetic Surveyor

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What Does it Take to Be a Geodetic Surveyor?

Geodetic Surveyor Definition Measure large areas of the Earth’s surface using satellite observations, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), light detection and ranging (LIDAR), or related sources.

Geodetic Surveyor Responsibilities

  • Analyze control or survey data to ensure adherence to project specifications or land survey standards.
  • Request additional survey data when field collection errors occur or engineering surveying specifications are not maintained.
  • Compute, retrace, or adjust existing surveys of features such as highway alignments, property boundaries, utilities, control and other surveys to match the ground elevation-dependent grids, geodetic grids, or property boundaries and to ensure accuracy and continuity of data used in engineering, surveying, or construction projects.
  • Determine orientation of tracts of land, including position, boundaries, size, and shape, using theodolites, electronic distance-measuring equipment, satellite-based positioning equipment, land information systems, or other geodetic survey equipment.
  • Review existing standards, controls, or equipment used, recommending changes or upgrades as needed.
  • Compute horizontal and vertical coordinates of control networks, using direct leveling or other geodetic survey techniques, such as triangulation, trilateration, and traversing, to establish features of the Earth’s surface.

Geodetic Surveyor Skills

Geodetic Surveyors state the following job skills are important in their day-to-day work.

Mathematics: Using mathematics to solve problems.

Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Complex Problem Solving: Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Types of Geodetic Surveyor

  • Remote Sensing Surveyor
  • Geodetic Survey Director
  • Geodetic Computator
  • Remote Advisor
  • Licensed Land Surveyor

What Kind of Geodetic Surveyor Job Opportunities Are There?

There were about 44,800 jobs for Geodetic Surveyor in 2016 (in the United States). New jobs are being produced at a rate of 11.2% which is above the national average. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 5,000 new jobs for Geodetic Surveyor by 2026. The BLS estimates 3,800 yearly job openings in this field.

Forecasted Number of Jobs for Geodetic Surveyors in U.S.

The states with the most job growth for Geodetic Surveyor are Utah, Florida, and North Dakota. Watch out if you plan on working in Vermont, Washington, or Maine. These states have the worst job growth for this type of profession.

Do Geodetic Surveyors Make A Lot Of Money?

Geodetic Surveyors make between $35,160 and $102,220 a year.

Salary Ranges for Geodetic Surveyors

Geodetic Surveyors who work in California, Washington, or Nevada, make the highest salaries.

How much do Geodetic Surveyors make in different U.S. states?

State Annual Mean Salary
Alabama $56,010
Alaska $79,940
Arizona $62,050
Arkansas $48,880
California $91,010
Colorado $66,010
Connecticut $70,810
Delaware $73,110
Florida $57,930
Georgia $59,500
Hawaii $65,880
Idaho $65,550
Illinois $72,540
Indiana $60,890
Iowa $65,250
Kansas $58,420
Kentucky $56,510
Louisiana $62,810
Maine $59,360
Maryland $65,220
Massachusetts $66,000
Michigan $58,850
Minnesota $65,950
Mississippi $46,660
Missouri $59,980
Montana $63,020
Nebraska $54,750
Nevada $80,520
New Hampshire $63,710
New Jersey $70,120
New Mexico $74,470
New York $77,660
North Carolina $70,460
North Dakota $75,360
Ohio $62,520
Oklahoma $54,130
Oregon $68,130
Pennsylvania $62,400
Rhode Island $60,070
South Carolina $49,570
South Dakota $67,970
Tennessee $49,280
Texas $59,980
Utah $69,150
Vermont $51,890
Virginia $70,230
Washington $85,860
West Virginia $65,750
Wisconsin $62,820
Wyoming $66,160

What Tools & Technology do Geodetic Surveyors Use?

Although they’re not necessarily needed for all jobs, the following technologies are used by many Geodetic Surveyors:

  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Office
  • Hypertext markup language HTML
  • Web browser software
  • Email software
  • Autodesk AutoCAD
  • Geographic information system GIS software
  • Bentley Microstation
  • ESRI ArcView
  • ESRI ArcGIS software
  • Virtual reality modeling language VRML software
  • Trimble Terramodel
  • Traverse PC
  • Autodesk CAiCE Visual Transportation
  • SiteComp Survey
  • QuickCogo

How to Become a Geodetic Surveyor

Are there Geodetic Surveyors education requirements?

Geodetic Surveyor Degree Level

How many years of work experience do I need?

Geodetic Surveyor Work Experience

Where Geodetic Surveyors Are Employed

Geodetic Surveyor Sectors

The table below shows some of the most common industries where those employed in this career field work.

Geodetic Surveyor Industries

You May Also Be Interested In…

Those thinking about becoming a Geodetic Surveyor might also be interested in the following careers:

Career changers with experience as a Geodetic Surveyor sometimes find work in one of the following fields:

References:

Image Credit: Mike1979 Russia via Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

More about our data sources and methodologies.

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