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Precision Agriculture Technician

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What Does it Take to Be a Precision Agriculture Technician?

Precision Agriculture Technician Definition Apply geospatial technologies, including geographic information systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS), to agricultural production or management activities, such as pest scouting, site-specific pesticide application, yield mapping, or variable-rate irrigation. May use computers to develop or analyze maps or remote sensing images to compare physical topography with data on soils, fertilizer, pests, or weather.

Life As a Precision Agriculture Technician: What Do They Do?

  • Contact equipment manufacturers for technical assistance, as needed.
  • Analyze geospatial data to determine agricultural implications of factors such as soil quality, terrain, field productivity, fertilizers, or weather conditions.
  • Collect information about soil or field attributes, yield data, or field boundaries, using field data recorders and basic geographic information systems (GIS).
  • Install, calibrate, or maintain sensors, mechanical controls, GPS-based vehicle guidance systems, or computer settings.
  • Recommend best crop varieties or seeding rates for specific field areas, based on analysis of geospatial data.
  • Compare crop yield maps with maps of soil test data, chemical application patterns, or other information to develop site-specific crop management plans.

Precision Agriculture Technician Skills

Below is a list of the skills most Precision Agriculture Technicians say are important on the job.

Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Active Learning: Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Types of Precision Agriculture Technician

  • Agriculture Technician
  • Extension Precision Agriculture Specialist
  • Precision Agriculture Technician
  • Precision Crop Manager
  • Precision Agronomist

Precision Agriculture Technician Employment Estimates

There were about 76,100 jobs for Precision Agriculture Technician in 2016 (in the United States). New jobs are being produced at a rate of 9.7% which is above the national average. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 7,400 new jobs for Precision Agriculture Technician by 2026. The BLS estimates 9,900 yearly job openings in this field.

Forecasted Number of Jobs for Precision Agriculture Technicians in U.S.

The states with the most job growth for Precision Agriculture Technician are Utah, Texas, and Nevada. Watch out if you plan on working in Wyoming, Maine, or Alaska. These states have the worst job growth for this type of profession.

Average Precision Agriculture Technicians Salary

The salary for Precision Agriculture Technicians ranges between about $29,830 and $80,370 a year.

Salary Ranges for Precision Agriculture Technicians

Precision Agriculture Technicians who work in Maryland, Connecticut, or Rhode Island, make the highest salaries.

How much do Precision Agriculture Technicians make in different U.S. states?

State Annual Mean Salary
Alabama $46,600
Alaska $56,470
Arizona $51,250
Arkansas $50,740
California $56,670
Colorado $51,890
Connecticut $62,090
District of Columbia $61,000
Florida $45,200
Georgia $52,690
Hawaii $57,310
Idaho $42,220
Illinois $51,130
Indiana $51,970
Iowa $46,740
Kansas $51,960
Kentucky $52,340
Louisiana $47,250
Maine $55,220
Maryland $69,500
Massachusetts $63,450
Michigan $43,640
Minnesota $50,440
Mississippi $52,950
Missouri $49,590
Montana $43,930
Nebraska $58,150
Nevada $47,690
New Hampshire $57,990
New Jersey $60,660
New Mexico $59,850
New York $53,380
North Carolina $53,390
North Dakota $52,050
Ohio $52,690
Oklahoma $57,950
Oregon $51,800
Pennsylvania $50,410
Rhode Island $59,480
South Carolina $56,910
South Dakota $45,190
Tennessee $43,440
Texas $54,290
Utah $50,980
Virginia $52,180
Washington $55,920
West Virginia $55,930
Wisconsin $52,500
Wyoming $53,940

What Tools do Precision Agriculture Technicians Use?

Below is a list of the types of tools and technologies that Precision Agriculture Technicians may use on a daily basis:

  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Office
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Web browser software
  • Microsoft Access
  • ESRI ArcView
  • ESRI ArcGIS software
  • ESRI ArcPad
  • MapShots EASi Suite
  • SST Development Group SSToolbox
  • John Deere Apex Farm Management
  • Ag Leader Technology SMS Advanced
  • Trimble AgGPS EZ-Map

Becoming a Precision Agriculture Technician

Education needed to be a Precision Agriculture Technician:

Precision Agriculture Technician Degree Level

How Long Does it Take to Become a Precision Agriculture Technician?

Precision Agriculture Technician Work Experience

Where do Precision Agriculture Technicians Work?

Precision Agriculture Technician Sectors

The table below shows the approximate number of Precision Agriculture Technicians employed by various industries.

Precision Agriculture Technician Industries

Other Jobs You May be Interested In

Those who work as a Precision Agriculture Technician sometimes switch careers to one of these choices:

References:

Image Credit: U.S. Department of Energy from United States via public domain

More about our data sources and methodologies.

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