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Fire Inspectors

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What Do Fire Inspectors Do?

Example of a Fire Inspector Job Inspect buildings and equipment to detect fire hazards and enforce state and local regulations.

What do Fire Inspectors do On a Daily Basis?

  • Arrange for the replacement of defective fire fighting equipment and for repair of fire alarm and sprinkler systems, making minor repairs such as servicing fire extinguishers when feasible.
  • Serve court appearance summonses or condemnation notices on parties responsible for violations of fire codes, laws, and ordinances.
  • Review blueprints and plans for new or remodeled buildings to ensure the structures meet fire safety codes.
  • Develop or review fire exit plans.
  • Inspect liquefied petroleum installations, storage containers, and transportation and delivery systems for compliance with fire laws.
  • Identify corrective actions necessary to bring properties into compliance with applicable fire codes, laws, regulations, and standards, and explain these measures to property owners or their representatives.

What Every Fire Inspector Should Know

Fire Inspectors state the following job skills are important in their day-to-day work.

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Speaking: Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Quality Control Analysis: Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.

Other Fire Inspector Job Titles

  • Fire Systems Inspector
  • Fire Inspector
  • Fire Sprinkler Inspector
  • Fire Official
  • Fire Prevention Specialist

Job Demand for Fire Inspectors

In 2016, there was an estimated number of 12,300 jobs in the United States for Fire Inspectors and Investigators.

New jobs are being produced at a rate of 7.3% which is lower than average. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 900 new jobs for Fire Inspectors by 2026. The BLS estimates 1,400 yearly job openings in this field per year.

Forecasted Number of Jobs for Fire Inspectors in U.S.

The states with the most job growth for Fire Inspectors and Investigators are Texas, Florida, and New York.

Watch out if you plan on working in New Jersey, Rhode Island, or North Dakota. These states have the worst job growth for this type of profession.

Fire Inspector Average Salary

The typical yearly salary for Fire Inspectors and Investigators is somewhere between $36,400 and $95,330. The median salary is $62,510.

Salary Ranges for Fire Inspectors

How much do Fire Inspectors and Investigators make in each U.S. state?

Annual Mean Salary by State
State Annual Mean Salary

California

$103,830

Oregon

$89,860

Washington

$81,430

District of Columbia

$75,800

Colorado

$74,790

Connecticut

$74,280

Alabama

$68,630

Minnesota

$68,210

Oklahoma

$68,080

Massachusetts

$66,710

Ohio

$66,650

New York

$66,580

Illinois

$64,760

Iowa

$64,680

Maryland

$64,490

Arizona

$64,190

Texas

$63,540

Florida

$63,040

New Hampshire

$62,700

Tennessee

$62,660

North Dakota

$61,850

Michigan

$59,740

Delaware

$58,820

Vermont

$58,790

Utah

$58,000

Wisconsin

$57,460

Pennsylvania

$56,890

Rhode Island

$56,130

New Jersey

$55,890

Virginia

$55,540

Maine

$54,600

South Carolina

$53,680

Indiana

$53,670

Kansas

$53,210

North Carolina

$52,760

Georgia

$52,010

New Mexico

$52,010

Louisiana

$50,990

West Virginia

$47,190

Missouri

$44,930

Arkansas

$44,310

Kentucky

$43,640

What Tools do Fire Inspectors Use?

Below is a list of the types of tools and technologies that Fire Inspectors may use on a daily basis:

  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Microsoft Office
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Word

Becoming a Fire Inspector

What education or degrees do I need to become a Fire Inspector?

Fire Inspector Degree Level

What work experience do I need to become a Fire Inspector?

Fire Inspector Work Experience

Where Fire Inspectors Are Employed

Fire Inspector Sectors

Similar Careers

Those thinking about becoming Fire Inspectors might also be interested in the following careers:

  • Aircraft Cargo Handling Supervisors
  • Police Detectives

Are you already one of the many Fire Inspectors in the United States? If you’re thinking about changing careers, these fields are worth exploring:

  • Police Detectives
  • Aviation Inspectors

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics

College Factual

O*NET Online

Image Credit: Via Wikimedia Commons

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