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Environmental Economist

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What Does it Take to Be an Environmental Economist?

Position Description Conduct economic analysis related to environmental protection and use of the natural environment, such as water, air, land, and renewable energy resources. Evaluate and quantify benefits, costs, incentives, and impacts of alternative options using economic principles and statistical techniques.

Life As an Environmental Economist: What Do They Do?

  • Assess the costs and benefits of various activities, policies, or regulations that affect the environment or natural resource stocks.
  • Identify and recommend environmentally friendly business practices.
  • Develop environmental research project plans, including information on budgets, goals, deliverables, timelines, and resource requirements.
  • Develop programs or policy recommendations to promote sustainability and sustainable development.
  • Interpret indicators to ascertain the overall health of an environment.
  • Write social, legal, or economic impact statements to inform decision makers for natural resource policies, standards, or programs.

Environmental Economist Needed Skills

These are the skills Environmental Economists say are the most useful in their careers:

Reading Comprehension: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Writing: Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Critical Thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Active Listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Judgment and Decision Making: Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Active Learning: Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

  • Energy Economist
  • Environmental Economist
  • Marine Resource Economist
  • Agricultural Economist
  • Environmental Protection Economist

What Kind of Environmental Economist Job Opportunities Are There?

In 2016, there was an estimated number of 21,300 jobs in the United States for Environmental Economist. New jobs are being produced at a rate of 6.1% which is above the national average. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 1,300 new jobs for Environmental Economist by 2026. Due to new job openings and attrition, there will be an average of 1,600 job openings in this field each year.

Forecasted Number of Jobs for Environmental Economists in U.S.

The states with the most job growth for Environmental Economist are Alabama, Louisiana, and Washington. Watch out if you plan on working in Wyoming, West Virginia, or Vermont. These states have the worst job growth for this type of profession.

Do Environmental Economists Make A Lot Of Money?

The typical yearly salary for Environmental Economists is somewhere between $58,130 and $182,560.

Salary Ranges for Environmental Economists

Environmental Economists who work in District of Columbia, Virginia, or Maryland, make the highest salaries.

How much do Environmental Economists make in different U.S. states?

State Annual Mean Salary
Alabama $103,740
Alaska $85,970
Arizona $93,350
Arkansas $75,380
California $124,430
Colorado $104,350
Connecticut $95,450
Delaware $86,850
District of Columbia $134,260
Florida $105,230
Georgia $111,570
Hawaii $98,100
Idaho $61,130
Illinois $108,690
Indiana $84,740
Iowa $87,530
Kansas $72,600
Louisiana $103,070
Maryland $116,870
Massachusetts $117,680
Michigan $90,040
Minnesota $81,720
Mississippi $75,450
Missouri $112,240
Montana $89,980
Nebraska $81,010
Nevada $79,170
New Hampshire $74,570
New Jersey $100,500
New Mexico $87,680
New York $127,520
North Carolina $81,470
Ohio $125,490
Oklahoma $76,500
Oregon $87,420
Pennsylvania $87,630
South Carolina $68,550
Tennessee $83,350
Texas $106,480
Utah $88,280
Vermont $96,620
Virginia $126,080
Washington $95,010
West Virginia $68,430
Wisconsin $80,070

What Tools do Environmental Economists Use?

Below is a list of the types of tools and technologies that Environmental Economists may use on a daily basis:

  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Word
  • Microsoft Office
  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • Microsoft Outlook
  • Web browser software
  • Microsoft Access
  • MySQL
  • The MathWorks MATLAB
  • SAS
  • Microsoft Visual Basic
  • IBM SPSS Statistics
  • Minitab
  • C
  • StataCorp Stata
  • Wolfram Research Mathematica
  • Formula translation/translator FORTRAN
  • Insightful S-PLUS
  • ESRI ArcGIS software
  • Aptech Systems GAUSS

How do I Become an Environmental Economist?

Individuals working as an Environmental Economist have obtained the following education levels:

Environmental Economist Degree Level

How many years of work experience do I need?

Environmental Economist Work Experience

Where do Environmental Economists Work?

Environmental Economist Sectors

Environmental Economists work in the following industries:

Environmental Economist Industries

References:

Image Credit: Bernard Ladenthin via Public domain

More about our data sources and methodologies.

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